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Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Edward BELLINGHAM [Sir]

BIOGRAPHY: Apparently this individual was knighted and given the title, Knight of the Rhodes. Another source states that the title comes from a battle he fought in for the King on the isle of Rhodes in the Mediterranean.


William BELLINGHAM

OCCUPATION: 'The Heraldic Visitation of Westmoreland' simply states that he was "Sergeant of the wood-yard".


Richard BELLINGHAM

BIOGRAPHY: Apparently he was Sheriff of counties Surrey and Sussex from 1528-29, 1534-35, and 1542-43.


Richard BELLINGHAM

BIOGRAPHY: Apparently he was Sheriff of counties Surrey and Sussex from 1528-29, 1534-35, and 1542-43.


Richard BELLINGHAM

BIOGRAPHY: Apparently he was Sheriff of counties Surrey and Sussex from 1528-29, 1534-35, and 1542-43.


Edward BELLINGHAM [Sir]

BIOGRAPHY: While still an infant, his father died in France. He and his brother John, became wards of the 2nd Duke of Norfolk. Member of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem by 1523. Fought in the French campaign of 1543 where he was taken prisoner in November 1543 but released the following year. Also fought in the British defense of Boulogne, France in December of 1545. Minister of Parliament in 1545 from Gatton. In 1544, Sir Edward Bellingham was a servant of the Privy Chamber to King Edward VI of England and was knighted in September of 1547. Appointed Lord Deputy of Ireland from 1548-49. The played a crucial role in supressing native Irish in their rebellion against the British Crown. Apparently he was recalled after only 18 months because of reports of his arrogance although he was praised as an excellent administrator. There are also sources that state he was in ill health.

BELLINGHAM, SIR EDWARD (d. 1549), lord deputy of Ireland, was a son of Edward Bellingham of Erringham, Sussex, his mother being a member of the Shelley family. As a soldier he fought in France and elsewhere, then became an English member of parliament and a member of the privy council, and in 1547 took part in some military operations in Ireland. In May 1548 he was sent to that country as lord deputy. Ireland was then in a very disturbed condition, but the new governor crushed a rebellion of the O’Connors in Leinster, freed the Pale from rebels, built forts, and made the English power respected in Munster and Connaught. Bellingham, however, was a headstrong man and was constantly quarrelling with his council; but one of his opponents admitted that he was "the best man of war that ever he had seen in Ireland." His short but successful term of office was ended by his recall in 1549.


Barbara DALSTON

NAME: The Dalston surname may come from her previous husband.